A banister has multiple user groups

We don’t always know what a design is intended to convey. We don’t always recognise or relate to a design’s intended user groups. But we don’t have to know everything that an object’s design is intended to do, in order to make effective use of the object.

I imagine the metal inserts in the wooden banister (see the video, above) are detectable warnings for people who are visually impaired, but that’s only a guess. If you watch the video again, you’ll see that the metal inserts do not occur at every bend in the staircase.

Whatever the intent, the banister fully met my needs.

User performance depends on conditions

In early June, in a hotel lobby, I stopped to observe someone troubleshooting a wireless connection. I’ve faced this challenge myself, since every hotel seems to have a slightly different process for connecting.

The person I was observing was visually impaired and had his GUI enlarged by about 1000% or more. As he attempted to troubleshoot his wireless connection, he was very rapidly scrolling horizontally and vertically in order to read the text and view the icons in the Wireless Connection Status dialog box. The hugely enlarged GUI flew around the screen. His screen displayed only a small portion of the total GUI, but he never lost his place.

Only part of the screen is visible

In contrast, I lost my place repeatedly. I couldn’t relate the different pieces of information, so what I saw was effectively meaningless to me much of the time. His spatial awareness—his ability to navigate quickly around a relatively large area—was clearly more developed than mine.

I could not keep up with all of the text, either, even when he was reading it to me out loud: “It says ‘Signal Strength” is 4 bars, but it won’t connect. See?” (Well, actually, I didn’t see.) Though I’m very familiar with this dialog box, I could only read the shorter words as they flew by on screen. The larger words were illegible to me. His ability to read rapidly-moving whole words when only parts of them were visible at any given instant was much more developed than mine. I felt sheepish about being functionally illiterate under these conditions.

Flying text is hard to read

It was interesting to see how my own user performance depends on such a narrow range of conditions. I need to see the whole word and its context. I need to see at least half the dialog box at once. And, if the image is moving, it must be moving slowly.