Visual-design principles in practice: A team self-assessment

In a lecture about user-experience design to software developers at Stanford University, Jeremy Lyon explained how important it is for software’s visual design to reinforce its use and meaning. He listed five principles that he wants designers and developers to apply:

  • Balance.
  • Rhythm.
  • Dominance.
  • Motion.
  • Unity.

For fun, I decided to use these five visual-design principles to assess a recent project I worked on with a team of developers. In this article, I’m only illustrating a small portion of our design—an application that helps people set up a corporate event, issue formal invitations, and then track all related communication that results. Continue reading “Visual-design principles in practice: A team self-assessment”

Modernist design: Beyond flat and simple

Earlier this decade, the big players in software adopted modernist design for their user interfaces. With this redesign, digital came of age, with a look and feel that’s no longer bound by last century’s conventions or bound by the inexperience of those new to computing. Modernist user interfaces focus people on their current task, supports fast-paced use, and embraces the fact that the interfaces are digital.

You’ve seen and used modernist interfaces, on your Apple phones and tablets, in Google products, and in Microsoft Office and Microsoft Windows. But let me explain what modernism is and what it isn’t.

Modernism sometimes gets reduced—incorrectly—into two guidelines:

  • Put fewer elements on the screen.
  • Make what’s still there look simpler and flatter.

Blindly applying those two guidelines without understanding the underlying principles can lead to puzzling and inconsistent experiences. In some cases—including in products by the big players—fewer items and less visual detail on screen has resulted in the removal or omission of the necessary cues that separate content from controls, the cues that allow people to learn and use the software effectively. In other words, overzealous application of the two oversimplified design guidelines has made some modernist products less usable.

Let’s examine each of the purported benefits listed above. Continue reading “Modernist design: Beyond flat and simple”

Overcoming an initial language barrier

Imagine completing a form that asks for your initials—the first letters of each of your names. Now imagine you’re from a culture where your name isn’t written in letters, but in strokes and characters.

Some basic stroke orders of Chinese characters

In some cases, the concept of initials needs clarification, as the sign below indicates. The sign, spotted at Simon Fraser University by Seanna Takacs, explains in Chinese how to identify one’s initials.

A sign that explains what ''initials'' are

Isn’t this clever? Apparently, the staff only needs to point at the sign, and it does the rest.

But this raises some questions

  • Was the form tested on all audiences?
  • Are initials necessary, or could the form ask for different information?